College softball player hits for the home run cycle in only four innings

Never in the history of Major League Baseball (MLB) has a player hit for the home run cycle. Unlike hitting for the cycle, which involves hitting a single, a double, a triple, and a home run in any order, hitting for the home run cycle involves hitting a solo home run, a two-run home run, a three-run home run, and a grand slam in any order.

However, two days ago, Danielle Gibson, a sophomore at the University of Arkansas and a member of the Arkansas Razorbacks women’s softball team, hit for the home run cycle in a non-conference game against the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE) Cougars.

Gibson completed the home run cycle in the following order: two-run home run (i.e., home run with one runner on base), three-run home run (i.e., a home run with two runners on base), grand slam (i.e., a home run with the bases loaded), and solo home run (i.e., a home run with the bases empty).

To say the least, this is a remarkable achievement. Remember that regulation National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) softball games are only seven innings in length, so, in theory, it is actually harder to hit for the home run cycle in a college softball game than it is in a MLB baseball game due to the shorter length of the game. Also, Gibson completed her home run cycle in the fourth inning of the game; it is relatively rare in baseball and softball for any player to have a fourth plate appearance of a game in the fourth inning.

AUTHOR’S NOTE: This is the second of two blog posts previewing the author of this blog post’s work as a blogger prior to the full launch of Apollo Corner on March 1.